Adult Psychoanalytic Training

WE ARE ONLY ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR THE PSYCHOTHERAPY CLASS, WE DO NOT HAVE AN ADULT PSYCHOANALYTIC CLASS SCHEDULED

NOBPC’s five-year adult psychoanalytic training program is conducted on a trimester academic calendar and teaches the theory and practice of psychoanalysis to qualified candidates. The program offers a full course of study for professional training in this field and encourages research in the science of psychoanalysis. Candidates receive instruction and supervision from analysts and Training Analysts in New Orleans, Birmingham and other major cities, exposing them to decades of analytic experience and expertise.

The curriculum is comprised of (30) 90-minute classes per trimester in the first four years of training. In the fifth year, candidates select topics of interest and meet a minimum of once per month with invited faculty for discussion.

 

Application for Adult Psychoanalytic Training

 


 

Adult training at NOBPC is divided into three major areas:

  1. Four-year didactic curriculum includes theoretical and clinical coursework. Candidates are required to complete all courses and seminars outlined in the curriculum Classes meet on Fridays from 2p-7pm (September through May). See curriculum in sidebar.
  2. Weekly supervision of clinical work with a supervising psychoanalyst on the New Orleans-Birmingham Psychoanalytic faculty. A minimum of three adult non-psychotic cases including both male and female patients is required. Each case will have a different supervising analyst. As the treatment with each case progresses, frequency of supervision may change. Case write-ups are part of the clinical requirements. To meet graduation requirements the supervising analyst and the Education Committee must agree that one case has completed a successful termination or is solidly in termination phase and that the other two cases are in solid mid phase.
  3. Personal Training Psychoanalysis with a Training Analyst should be conducted with the analysand on the couch a minimum of four sessions per week. While the candidate is encouraged to begin his/her personal analysis prior to his/her psychoanalytic training, it is required to begin at the onset of training and should continue during training and through a substantial portion of the candidate’s supervised clinical psychoanalytic work. The Personal analysis allows candidates to confront and understand his or her own unconscious conflicts and attitudes and provides experience of the dynamic unconscious, resistances and transference.

 


 

NOBPC considers applications from physicians & non-physicians.

Prospective Physician Candidates
In order to be considered for admission, applicants must be graduates of a medical school approved by the American Medical Association. The applicant will be considered for admission after satisfactory completion of the second year of psychiatric training. The applicant must be licensed in their state of residence and must carry professional liability insurance.

Prospective Non-Medical Candidates for Clinical Psychoanalytic Training
Must have obtained the highest clinical degree in their fields and must have a significant amount of experience in the practice of psychotherapy. Eligible applicants must be licensed in their state of residence, professionally insured (professional liability insurance) and practicing.

Eligible applicants are those who have attained a MSW, DSW, LPC, DMH, MS in psychiatric nursing, PsyD, EdD, or PhD in psychology.

Prospective Non-Physician & Research Candidates

Non-Clinicians may apply for training at NOBPC either to facilitate their scholarly work in another field (research candidates) or for purposes of pursuing a career in the practice of psychoanalysis as a CORST candidate. CORST Candidates must also be vetted by the American Psychoanalytic Association.  The vetting process includes the requirement of preclinical preparation which must be completed before psychoanalytic training cases can begin.  To be considered for admission, the applicant must have established themselves as recognized scholars and research workers in their own fields and need to have a clear plan for the ways in which psychoanalytic training would further their continuing research.

NOBPC does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, national or ethnic origin, gender, sexual orientation or physical disability.

Questions concerning the Adult Psychoanalytic Training program and the application procedure can be directed to the New Orleans-Birmingham Psychoanalytic Center at (504)899-5815 or email to nobpcenter@gmail.com.

Early application is recommended.

Download Application


 

The course of study is the same for all accepted applicants.

 

Year One  Adult Psychoanalytic Training Curriculum

Year One / 1st Trimester

ACC: Opening Phase-Psychoanalytic Case
Candidates present current psychoanalytic work in detail in these seminars. The material is used to discuss the overall process of psychoanalysis and technical issues in general. Under optimal circumstances, there is special emphasis on the problems of the opening phase with particular attention paid to the therapeutic alliance.

Getting Started, Ethics
Analyzability, setting the analytic frame and the analyst’s perspective: One main objective of scheduling this course very early in the curriculum is to familiarize candidates with some of the issues involved in starting the first analytic case, as candidates are encouraged to begin an analytic case shortly after the course is finished. Attention is given to the very common phenomena of transition from psychotherapy to psychoanalysis and the complexity of such change. Suitability of a particular individual to successfully participate in analysis is considered from a variety of perspectives with attention to some follow-up studies.

The ethics portion of this course acquaints the candidates with the ethics of psychoanalysis as they apply in the clinical situation. Confidentiality, records, and conflicts of interest are discussed in depth. The various non-sexual boundary violations involving gifts, fees, dual relationships, and excessive self-disclosure are described with attention to difficult clinical situations. The problem of sexual boundary violations is also taught in terms of the high-risk situations involving particular groups of patients as well as vulnerabilities in analysts.

Human Development Through Adolescence
The developmental phases of infancy, pre-oedipal, oedipal, latency and adolescence are approached from different theoretical perspectives and an attempt at definition of these phases is suggested. Psychopathology emerging at these times is categorized and described, with the help of literature as reference. Actual case material may be available from class members.

 

Year One / 2nd Trimester

Working with Dreams
This course will cover psychoanalytic theory of dreaming and its application to clinical work, “The Interpretation of Dreams,” and other writings, and contrast these with contemporary views of the dream process. Changing views about the role of dream interpretation in psychoanalysis and the influence of various psychoanalytic theories on clinical work with dreams will be examined through selected readings and the presentation of clinical dream material by candidates and teachers.

CTD I: Classical and Ego Psychology Theories of Development
Freud’s trauma, topographical, and structural models are presented as representing the primary origins of psychoanalysis. Subsequently, Hartman’s adaptive model (Ego Psychology) and the work of Erikson, Spitz, Jacobson and Loewald are considered in their relationship to the further modifications and developments led by Anna Freud and Joseph Sandler.

ACC: Opening Phase-Psychodynamic Case (with readings)
Candidates and/or fellows present current psychodynamic work in detail in these seminars. The material is used to discuss the overall process of psychoanalytic psychotherapy and technical issues in general. Under optimal circumstances, there is special emphasis on the problems of the opening phase with specific attention paid to the therapeutic alliance. Readings appropriate to the case material will be discussed.

 

Year One / 3rd Trimester

Beginning to Write
The focus in this initial class on writing will be to assist candidates in writing their six-month reports. There will be free writing exercises at the beginning of each class and discussion of these writings among class members. Candidates will be asked to describe the therapeutic process in one session, process over a week, and then process over a month of analytic work. Finally, candidates are expected to bring a draft of their six-month report. Copies will be given to members of the class with small group discussions. These discussions of reports will be done in an atmosphere that focuses on the writing: what works, what does not work, whether the sentences are clear, the paragraphs are coherent, the voice active, and whether there is good description of analytic process. These sessions are not supervisory sessions on clinical work but on understanding and learning effective writing. It is emphasized how vulnerable one is when writing and that it is important to be respectful of this when discussing colleagues’ work. The last sessions of this trimester will continue with free writes at the beginning of class and then discussion of readings and other writing that candidates may be doing.

A/I: Ego Psychology Theory
This course will examine the shift from the early topographical model of Freud to the later structural model (1923/26) and the increased importance given to the role of the ego within that model. Attention will be given to how a changed understanding of defense, intrapsychic conflict, compromise formation, internalization, and adaptation has influenced our understanding of the psychoanalytic process and technique. Key authors to be studied will include S. Freud (1923/26), A. Freud, Arlow, Brenner, Waelder, Mahler, Paul Gray, David Beres, and Joseph Sandler.

TAC I: Basic Concepts of Treatment & Change
In this seminar, basic theories of therapeutic action in the context of the aims and goals of the fundamental theoretical perspectives will be considered. Catharsis/abreaction, interpretation, extra transferential interventions, empathy, relational/interpretive learning, enactments, reconstruction, “new experience” in the therapeutic encounter, and other topics will be discussed in their relationship to change—both temporary and permanent.


 

Year Two  Adult Psychoanalytic Training Curriculum

Year Two / 1st Trimester

ACC: Mid-Phase-Psychoanalytic Case
Candidates present current psychoanalytic work in detail in these seminars. The material is used to discuss the overall process of psychoanalysis and technical issues in general. Under optimal circumstances, there is special emphasis on the problems of the mid phase including the process of working through.

Resistance & Transference
Resistance, transference and countertransference are the three core technical concepts of psychoanalysis. Resistance is the unconscious process that opposes psychic change. Transference is the patient’s experience of the past in the relationship with the analyst. Countertransference is the analyst’s response to the patient in their relationship. In this course the student is immersed in these highly complex concepts. The readings begin with Freud’s efforts to understand resistance and transference as he invented psychoanalysis, focus next on the work of Greenson who in the 1960’s attempted to codify analytic technique, and then include contributions by contemporary psychoanalysts who examine the psychoanalytic process in new and creative ways.

CTD II: Object Relationship Theory of Development
In the second trimester of this series, various Object Relations approaches to psychoanalysis will be discussed, beginning with Klein, Bion, and Rosenfeld and extending into the views of the “independent school” of British psychoanalysts (Fairbairn, Guntrip, and Winnicott). The relationship between these approaches and the work of Kernberg and Kohut will be taken up along with Bowlby’s attachment theory, Fonagy and Target’s view of mentalization, and the approaches of the contemporary London Kleinians (Brett-Spillius, Joseph, Steiner, Britton, Friedman, et al.) The seminar follows an outline of broad themes as psychoanalysts moved from drive theory to object relations and attachment theory.

 

Year Two / 2nd Trimester

CTD III: Infant Research and Attachment Theory
In this trimester we will look at the contributions of modern infant research to our understanding of the infant’s psychological development. The findings of infant research have challenged many of the fundamental concepts of classical psychoanalytic thought. If psychoanalytic theory is to remain a viable scientific theory of human psychological development, these findings must be taken into account. In this trimester we will cover the contributions of Bowlby, Stern, Beebe and Lachmann, Fonagy and Lichtenberg, and others.

A/I: Object Relations Theory I
The course will focus specifically on the clinical implications of the shift away from the Freudian instinct model to the role of object relationships and “internal objects” in the understanding of the therapeutic frame, the content of analytic material, therapeutic interventions, and the nature of therapeutic change. This course will include readings from the works of Klein/Bion School, including Joseph, Britton, and Steiner, the works of the British Independent School including Fairbairn, Guntrip, Balint, Winnicott, and Bollas, and the American Object Relations theorists including Jacobson, Kernberg and Ogden, and others.

ACC: Mid-Phase-Psychodynamic Case (with readings)
Candidates/fellows present current psychodynamic work in detail in these seminars. The material is used to discuss the overall process of psychoanalytic psychotherapy and technical issues in general. Under optimal circumstances, there is special emphasis on the problems of the mid phase including the process of working through. Readings appropriate to the case material will be discussed.

 

Year Two / 3rd Trimester

Neurobiology
In this course the candidates will learn some of the basic neuroscience concepts that are influencing the field of psychoanalysis. Beginning with a discussion of the philosophical mind-body problem, the seminar then provides a foundation in neural network theory. Procedural and declarative memory, along with their implications for psychoanalytic conceptualization and technique, are also discussed in-depth. One session features the impact of neurobiology on psychoanalytic views of dreaming. The impact of psychoanalytic treatment on the brain is also covered, as are speculations about how our knowledge of neuroscience affects concepts like transference, compromise formation, and therapeutic action. Authors covered include Kandel, Edelman, Gabbard, Westen, Schore, Solms, and Damasio.

TAC II: Personality Disorders
In this seminar, basic diagnostic categories of psychopathology (obsessive, hysteric, character neurosis, etc.) will be presented and explored. Analytically appropriate therapeutic approaches to diagnosis in relation to each theoretical perspective will be considered in the context of therapeutic action and outcome.

ACC: Termination-Psychodynamic Case (with readings)
Candidates/fellows present current psychodynamic work in detail in these seminars. The material is used to discuss the overall process of psychoanalytic psychotherapy and technical issues in general. Under optimal circumstances, there is special emphasis on the problems of the termination. Readings appropriate to the case material will be discussed.


 

Year Three  Adult Psychoanalytic Training Curriculum

Year Three / 1st Trimester

Classical Theory I
This course surveys writings of early psychoanalysts. Readings begin with Sigmund Freud’s earliest papers in which he discovered fundamentals of psychoanalysis and the unconscious through his development of later theories and technical applications. The course ends with an introduction to psychoanalytic schools that developed from Freud’s earliest ideas: ego psychology and object relations theory. Emphasis will be on understanding the clinical origin and application of all readings.

TAC III: Countertransference, Self-Analysis, and Consultation
This seminar emphasizes the current view of the analyst’s subjectivity in analytic theory and technique. Beginning with Freud’s narrow view of countertransference, the evolution of the broader conceptualization is traced through Kleinian theories about projective identification, Sandler’s role responsiveness, and current views of the analyst’s subjectivity as difficult to differentiate from countertransference. Special emphasis is on the role of working with one’s countertransference as part of the analyst’s clinical process with the patient. Self-analysis is also discussed as a way of handling countertransference. Finally, the crucial role of lifelong consultation in the analyst’s professional career is taught.

Adult Development
Personality development does not end with adolescence but continues on into adulthood. Specific issues such as work, intimacy, parenting, empty nesting, retirement, illness, and death must be navigated during this phase of life. And though these may not occur in any particular order or pattern as do those of childhood, they must each be addressed if the processes of psychological growth and vitality are to be continued throughout the life cycle. The intrapsychic meaning of these events will be our primary focus, and we will read the leaders in the field such as Nemiroff, Colarusso, and Lidz among others. We will also try to understand both typical patterns that emerge and variations that occur in non-conventional life styles. As part of our effort to keep the focus of this class intrapsychic, we will end by looking at the emerging literature on the analysis of the elderly.

 

Year Three / 2nd Trimester

Classical Theory II
This course surveys writings of early psychoanalysts. Readings begin with Sigmund Freud’s earliest papers in which he discovered fundamentals of psychoanalysis and the unconscious through his development of later theories and technical applications. The course ends with an introduction to psychoanalytic schools that developed from Freud’s earliest ideas: ego psychology and object relations theory. Emphasis will be on understanding the clinical origin and application of all readings.

A/I: Object Relations Theory II & Self Psychology Theory
The course will focus specifically on the clinical implications of the shift away from the Freudian instinct model to the role of object relationships and “internal objects” in the understanding of the therapeutic frame, the content of analytic material, therapeutic interventions, and the nature of therapeutic change. This course will include readings from the works of Klein/Bion School, including Joseph, Britton, and Steiner, the works of the British Independent School including Fairbairn, Guntrip, Balint, Winnicott, and Bollas, and the American Object Relations theorists including Jacobson, Kernberg and Ogden, and others.

This course will comprise five seminars exploring some of the implications of self-psychology for understanding the nature of the analytic setting, transference and countertransference, the content of analytic material, therapeutic interventions, and the nature of therapeutic change. The course will include readings from the writings of Kohut, Wolf, Paul and Anna Ornstein, Goldberg, Bacall, Lichtenberg and Beebe among others.

ACC: Mid-Phase-Psychoanalytic Case
Candidates present current psychoanalytic work in detail in these seminars. The material is used to discuss the overall process of psychoanalysis and technical issues in general. Under optimal circumstances, there is special emphasis on the problems of the mid phase including the process of working through.

 

Year Three / 3rd Trimester

Classical Theory III
This course surveys writings of early psychoanalysts. Readings begin with Sigmund Freud’s earliest papers in which he discovered fundamentals of psychoanalysis and the unconscious through his development of later theories and technical applications. The course ends with an introduction to psychoanalytic schools that developed from Freud’s earliest ideas: ego psychology and object relations theory. Emphasis will be on understanding the clinical origin and application of all readings.

Gender and Sexuality
This course will explore the evolution of psychoanalytic theories of gender development and sexuality as a motivational force within the broader psychoanalytic corpus. Attention will be given to Freud’s early contributions and those of structural theorists as well as the more recent writings of object-relations, intersubjective, relational, and feminist revisionists. The course will also include seminars on homosexuality.
This course will be preparatory for the year-four course on Perversions and Neosexualities.

ACC: Mid-Phase-Psychoanlaytic Case
Candidates present current psychoanalytic work in detail in these seminars. The material is used to discuss the overall process of psychoanalysis and technical issues in general. Under optimal circumstances, there is special emphasis on the problems of the mid phase including the process of working through.


 

Year Four  Adult Psychoanalytic Training Curriculum

Year Four / 1st Trimester

Child Analysis
An overview of the conceptual framework and basic premises underlying the psychoanalytic treatment of children and adolescents; the clinical approaches and some selected problems involved in the assessment of analyzability and the beginning phase of treatment, the middle phase and termination; and major areas of controversy as well as issues and questions for investigation.

Special Technical Issues in Psychoanalysis
Each session addresses a major topic that is seen by experienced analysts to sometimes derail psychoanalysis if the process does not take account of these issues, as part of the overall process. Often there is not an adequate literature addressing these Issues. So that instead of extensive reading, candidates may be asked to present case vignettes illustrated by the topic of the session and the teachers may also introduce vignettes, from their own extensive clinical experience.

A/I: Relational/Intersubjective/Constructivist Theories
This seminar focuses on cutting edge developments in contemporary psychoanalysis. In particular, postmodern views are emphasized, especially as they affect the clinical situation. These particular models, including relational theory, interpersonal theory, constructivism, and intersubjectivity, all regard absolute objectivity as a myth. A common theme in this literature is that the perceptions of the patient are inevitably colored by the clinician’s subjectivity. All of these models are considered two-person psychologies, and the key authors to be studied in this class include Mitchell, Aron, Hoffman, Greenberg, Renik, Stolorow, Benjamin, and Davies.

 

Year Four / 2nd Trimester

TAC IV: Borderline, Narcissistic, and Psychotic Disorders
This seminar discusses how one incorporates modifications of psychoanalytic technique in the treatment of narcissistic, borderline, and psychotic disorders. Different theoretical conceptualfzations of these disorders are covered in terms of how they influence the technical approach to the patients. Among the authors that are taught and discussed are Kohut, Kernberg, Fonagy, Gabbard, Ogden, and Goldberg.

Perversions/Neosexualities
In the last few years, there has been a notable decrease in analytic publications on this topic; however, the importance of understanding perversions, in their broadest sense, has not lost its importance for the analytic practitioner.
Traditional as well as more modern readings from different theoretical perspectives will be utilized in order to enlarge the scope of these phenomena and understand the many ways in which it can present or conceal itself in patients who do not fit the traditional diagnostic category of perversions.

ACC: Mis-Phase and Termination
Ideally, in later seminars, candidates will choose cases which illustrate middle and late-middle phase work, including the process of working through as well as issues surrounding termination.

 

Year Four / 3rd Trimester

Termination
The achievement of a satisfactory termination solidifies and clarifies the gains made during the entire psychoanalytic process. The indications for termination, the patient’s readiness to take on this final piece of work, and the roles of both analyst and analysand in initiating and facilitating the process will be examined during this course. In addition, we will try to understand the patient’s and the analyst’s resistance to termination as we look at the typical process of termination as well as the differences between planned and premature or forced terminations. We will also look at follow- up studies of post-termination contact between analyst and former analysand, particularly as these involve analytic candidates.

Elective

ACC: Termination
Ideally, in later seminars, candidates will choose cases which illustrate middle and late-middle phase work, including the process of working through as well as issues surrounding termination.


 

Year Five  Adult Psychoanalytic Training Curriculum

A minimum of monthly seminars on special interest topics selected by the candidates and invited faculty are required.